Seitan and his minions

Seitan and mushroom pie

I’ve been making a few mushroom and ale pies recently and it’s been pointed out to me that the addition of seitan can really give it an edge. Seitan doesn’t necessarily have to be difficult - if you’re feeling really lazy, you can buy some canned at most health food shops (look for mock duck). If you’re feeling more adventurous, you can try to make some yourself, although vital wheat gluten can be a bit tricky to get hold of. If you’re lucky enough to live near the Black Cat cafe, we sell it. Otherwise, you can get some online here. I use a basic recipe at the Post Punk Kitchen but there’s lots of options depending on how complicated you want it to be.

Once you’ve got your seitan, the rest is pretty simple. so here we go:

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Vegusto sausage, butter bean and leek bake

I’ve just finished eating this and I’m so excited that I had to post it immediately. Farmhouse-style Vegusto sausages are a real favourite at the Black Cat cafe - people seem more than happy to part with the extra £1 to upgrade their breakfasts. I don’t blame them. They have a juicy and delicious texture and an omnivorous friend of mine said he couldn’t tell the difference. Praise indeed.

I made this dish a while back using chorizo style sausage - it does work really well with that too, but overall I prefer it with the sausage. I would imagine it would work well with any good meat free sausage type thing. Also, go to town on the cayenne, it really makes a difference.

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Super Duper Easy Salads: Carrot, Beetroot and Sesame

I’ve recently rediscovered salads. Gone are the days of a sad lettuce, tomato and cucumber concoctions - it’s all about shredding, loud dressings, chunky nuts and nutritious seeds. Once you start experimenting there are a world of yummy combinations waiting to pass your lips….

Sesame seeds are a great source of Copper and Magnesium as well as Omega 6 fatty acids, proteins and fibre. They have a delicate nutty taste, are frequently used in Asian dishes and are probably best known for their part in sesame oil, halva and tahini. 

This recipe features lots of toasted sesame oil which I love because you get the full flavour of sesame in the salad without having to toast the sesame seeds; thus saving all those lovely proteins, metals and Omegas. Try it for yourself!

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Mushroom and lentil burgers with maple roasted vegetables

Hello all.

Things have been a bit on and off here at Vegetablah HQ. Life’s been throwing curve balls from every direction. Thankfully today I’ve got a bit of time so I thought I’d let you know about this delight that I concocted a while ago. It was one of those magical cooking moments where you just sort of throw things together and manage to create a masterpiece (horn blown).

Before I started the burger patties, I put the vegetables in the roast, because to get the best of them, you want to do them for at least an hour so they get good and crispy. I also served this with gravy - but I’m going to leave that for a separate post because it’s complex and gravy deserves to be singled out.

Also, these are really great just on their own with a big green salad and/or stuffed in a bun if you prefer something a bit less fried.

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Fuck yeah pankcakes!

Volunteering at the Black Cat Cafe has been great for all sorts of reasons. Lovely people, great food, sunny atmosphere. I’ve also had the sincerest pleasure in working under Carolyn, Irish vegan chef extraordinaire! I’ve been learning quite a few things from her - including how to make my pancakes the fluffiest, softest most yummy pancakes of all time.

So I thought I’d share them with you - you’re welcome :D

(picture courtesy of @Croxus)

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Leek, beetroot and ‘mock’ satay with noodles

What a long title! Luckily, this dish didn’t take very long at all. It was one of those “What do we have in the fridge?” sort of nights where we were busy doing other things (I was dying my hair and the boy was building us a four poster bed out of cardboard tubes. Because he’s awesome, that’s why). I am also thankful to our housemates who furnished us with a tin of mock duck to make it a bit more interesting. 

In all honesty, this makes a bit of a mockery of satay as the only truly satay-y ingredient is peanut butter, but since it had mock duck, I thought it could just be a ‘mock’ satay. It’s definitely a bit quick and dirty, but it tasted delicious. This is by no means haute cuisine.

I’d also like to point out that I totally cheated here with instant noodles. You could use proper noodles instead, although you’ll need to add a little vegetable stock or nutritional yeast for flavouring. I hope it fills you with glee! 

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Crop Drop leftovers!

I’ve had a really hectic couple of weeks moving house and I’ve barely had time to even think, let alone cook. That’s why I’ve got quite a few leftovers from last week. So instead of watching them rot in the fridge, I’ve carved out an hour to cook them up into a delicious pasta offering. If you have leftovers you should too!

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Crop Drop meets Experimental Pizza season: the Bombay Potato and Artichoke Pizza

My kitchen has been on full throttle all weekend. I’m super poor, so it’s been pretty quiet in all other respects, but what better way to spend an otherwise dull weekend by kicking off the first in a series on experimental pizza? I can’t lay claim to the idea - it was my boy’s. But it was a damn fine idea. It actually started out as experimental pizza month, but since this is the first time we’ve made one, we extended it to season, because ner :P

The bombay potato pizza idea was mine, however. Which is funny because I don’t really like potatoes at all. In the end we made three pizzas based around the same theme, so I’ll give you the basics of what we made and summarise with some awesome ideas we had along the way. You’re welcome.

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quarrygirl:

Vegan afternoon tea at a hotel near Hyde Park! £19 per person. Finger sandwiches (portobello, hummus, scrambled tofu, squash with cream of artichoke, roasted vegetable), homemade scones with strawberries and coconut cream, an assortment of raw cakes, earl grey tea with almond milk. (at La Suite West)

I remember finding this place when I was staying in Hyde Park earlier this year. Unfortunately we couldn’t go at the time. Luckily I actually live in London, so I basically have no excuse not to go….

quarrygirl:

Vegan afternoon tea at a hotel near Hyde Park! £19 per person. Finger sandwiches (portobello, hummus, scrambled tofu, squash with cream of artichoke, roasted vegetable), homemade scones with strawberries and coconut cream, an assortment of raw cakes, earl grey tea with almond milk. (at La Suite West)

I remember finding this place when I was staying in Hyde Park earlier this year. Unfortunately we couldn’t go at the time. Luckily I actually live in London, so I basically have no excuse not to go….

(via 17yearoldvegan)

Left-over root vegetable stew with kale and dumplings

If you’re anything like me, you get to a point where you’re totally fed up of opening the fridge only to see the same sad, slowly softening vegetables stare back at you. You were *totally* going to make that thing with them. Open. Close. Open. Close. SadFace. Eventually I lose it. I want to fill my fridge with new shiny things. THERE IS ANOTHER WAY!!

As a result of such a fridge-based, leftover, watershed event, I just invented this amazing thing for you. It’s going to change your life. Or probably not.

Additionally, my new mantra is ‘Stew needs a roux’ ‘STEW NEEDS A ROUX, LUE!’ I always forget this step - but you’re not me so I know you’ll remember (I will find you if you don’t). If you do though, don’t despair, you can make up paste using the flour and some water and stir that into the stew later when you remember. It’s much more inclined to go lumpy though, so be careful. If you’re wondering what a roux is, it’s a combination of wheat flour and fat - it’s basically just a thickening agent.

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